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Space Planning Principles for your Dining Spaces



Planning a new dining space or planning to redecorate/redesign your existing dining space? Below are some space planning principles to keep in mind for these areas of the home (note that the term used is not “dining room” but “dining space” for reasons discussed below).

Dining spaces may be called by several names and can be both indoors and outdoors. Indoor dining spaces typically are either a dining room or an eat-in kitchen but these spaces may also include other spaces in rooms such as a kitchen countertop eating space. Sometimes, these spaces are part of larger open concept rooms such as great rooms and sometimes they are closed off to each other. Outdoor dining spaces may include porches, decks, balconies, patios, and so much more.

Here are a few space planning principles to keep in mind for any dining space in your home:
  1. Dining spaces should have a focal point where a table can be anchored to that space. Typical focal and anchor points can be a fireplace, a large statement artwork, a good view, an architectural feature, a kitchen island, etc.
  2. Dining spaces should be close to the kitchen, or other food storage and cooking areas (e.g. a pantry, outdoor BBQ, outdoor kitchen, etc).
  3. Dining spaces should be awash in natural daylight.
  4. Dining spaces should be able to fit a table without interfering in the home's circulation patterns.

Photo by Michael Glass on Unsplash


While the architecture of your home may preclude some of these options, most homes are able to accomplish all of these principles. So, if you are thinking about decorating and designing the dining space(s) of your home, try to apply as many of these principles as possible.

If you haven't already, see these principles in action on our Houzz ideabook.

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