Space Planning Principles to Live By

Photo by Sergey Zolkin on Unsplash

Let's talk about space planning, which leads to the basic layout of a room. But first, it starts with an in-depth analysis of how the space is to be used, taking into account all who live in the home and even some visitors to the home. Rooms and spaces within rooms are zoned to account for different activities that take place in a space. For example, a large open-concept great room may have a zone for living (watching TV, reading a book, holding a casual conversation, etc) and a zone for dining (both day to day eating as well as dinner parties). Circulation zones that show how people will move through the space are defined in the space planning process; you don't want furniture to get in the way of people's expected movements. The space plan is finished by adding the furniture, decor, accessory, and artwork details.

Some times, there are conflicts that need to be resolved during the space planning process. For example, perhaps a quiet area to read a book would be nice but there may also be a need for a place for the kids to do homework. As another example, perhaps adding a focal point to a room would not fit within the overall redesign and redecorating budget. For the last example, there may not be enough room for both circulation and the intended functional use of the room. These are all items that must be reconciled in the final space plan.

Over the next few weeks, there will be some space planning principles shared here on this blog. These principles apply to living spaces, dining space, entry ways, bedrooms, bathrooms, kitchens, and more. Check back for detailed space planning design principles for each of these rooms.

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